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Towards Evidence-Based Practice in Science Education

Grant reference: L139251003

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Conference paper/presentation details

TLRP: Teaching pupils 'ideas-about-science': clarifying learning goals and improving pupil performance
This paper presents the findings of an empirical study conducted, using a Delphi technique, to answer the question 'What should be taught to school students about the nature of science?' The study was the first part of four projects of a funded network of research conducted by the University of York, the University of Leeds, the University of Southampton and King's College London whose principal aim was to develop and improve evidence-based practice in science education. This work, funded by the UK Economic and Social Science Research Council under the Teaching and Learning Programme, sought to provide empirical evidence of what the 'expert' community engaged with practising, communicating and teaching science thought was important for the average citizen to understand about science (as opposed to a knowledge of its content) at the end of their formal education. The second part of the project is exploring the implemented curriculum which might result from addressing these ideas about science. The paper is in four parts: The first section briefly considers and reviews the many issues in the burgeoning body of academic literature that surround the nature of science and its teaching in school science; the second, and the major part, presents the methodology and its findings; the third discusses the conclusions that can be drawn from this the Delphi study; the fourth presents some preliminary evidence from teachers' attempts to address particular ideas about science in their teaching.
Original Document

Primary contributor

Author J Osborne

Additional details

No