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Government strategies and commercial models: the politics of the global stem cell bioeconomy

Grant reference: PTA-350-27-0001-A

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Journal article details

Human embryonic stem cell research in the United States : some policy options for industry development
Since 1998, a significant global industry has developed around human embryonic stem cell (hESC) science, in which U.S.-based research is highly prominent. Yet the continued success of the United States in the global economy of hESC is not expected to last in the long term. In America, hESC research is both highly contentious and morally imperative; public interest is high, yet as a whole, the sector is seen to be underperforming. The regulatory, political, economic, and scientific limitations surrounding the development of hESC research in the United States have been widely discussed. The argument in this article is that the dominance of the biotechnology innovation model exacerbates the existing limitations to the long-term success of hESC research in the United States, and that the federal government has a more proactive role to play in managing stem cell innovation if U.S. advantage is going to be maintained.
Abstract
English

Primary contributor

Author Olivia Harvey

Keywords

stem cells; US; United States; policy making; stem cell research; medical research; scientific research

Additional details

37
1
Yes
0730-2177
Wiley-Blackwell
01 January 2009
51-71
London
Postprint
Politics & policy

Cite this outcome

Harvard

Harvey, Olivia (2009) Human embryonic stem cell research in the United States : some policy options for industry development. Politics & policy. 37 (1), pp. 51-71 London: Wiley-Blackwell.

Vancouver

Harvey Olivia. Human embryonic stem cell research in the United States : some policy options for industry development. Politics & policy 2009; 37 (1): 51-71.