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Our Research Catalogue contains grants and outputs data up to the end of April 2014. Records will no longer be updated after this date.

Exploring UK policing practices as a blueprint for democratic police reform: the overseas deployment of UK Police Officers, 1989 -2009

Grant reference: RES-000-22-3922

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Impact Report details

Exploring UK policing practices as a blueprint for democratic police reform: the overseas deployment of UK Police Officers, 1989-2009
Face to face meetings to provide debriefings to members of ACPO IA in relation to the project's research findings and written recommendations to provide assistance in the development of ongoing international policing policy, strategy and direction from 2010 onwards.
English

Primary contributor

Author Clive Emsley

Additional contributors

Co-author Georgina Sinclair

Impacts

1. Project has generated linkage between Open University academics (project team) and UK police (specifically ACPO International Affairs) in relation to the history of international policing assistance and current (2010-2012) challenges faced by stakeholders and providers of international policing. 2. These knowledge transfer activities have led to Sinclair assisting UK police in relation to policy development and strategy and public relations activities more generally. 3. Sinclair has attended the cross-government/police International Policing Assistance Board (IPAB)(2011-to date) as the sole academic representative and has spoken at ACPO conferences. 4. Sinclair has presented project findings to international police forums including Australian Federal Police and Hong Kong Police (2012).

1. Project identified and mapped the framework (2010-2012) for the provision of overseas policing services (across government and police) and the challenges faced in relation to fragemented stakeholder/provider services; blurring of state and corporate sectors and the lack of official government/police policy. 2. Project highlighted the challenges faced by UK police in providing sufficient serving police officers for overseas missions in the light of ongoing government reforms to UK police. 3. Project highlighted specific UK policing styles and systems transferred internationally, and, the extent to which UK officers skill-base were reshaped which had an impact on local/domestic policing issues on their return from an international mission. Additionally it demonstrated that UK policing was held in high regard by international police/stakeholders particularly in relation to community policing (in its broadest sense). 4. Within current overseas missions (e.g. Afghanistan), the project identified possible 'lessons learnt' for dissemination as 'best practice guidance' within UK policing policy and procedures.

1. Face-to-face debriefings: Sinclair met with members of ACPO IA 27 times between May 2010 and November 2011. Meetings have continued since November 2011 to the present time (November 2012). 2. Written reports and policy documents provided between May 2010 and November 2011 (e.g. relating to IPAB). 3. Current and future projects activities cited in IPAB yearly reports (2011, 2012) and Sinclair personally commended by CC Port. 4. Sinclair co-editor of ACPO IA newsletter (2011, 2012) and assistance with the development of a updated website.

1) Association of Chief Police Officers (International Affairs) (ACPO IA) Lead: Chief Constable Colin Port (Avon and Somerset) and members of ACPO IA team. 2) MOD Police International Secondments Office team.

With ongoing changes taking place in UK policing (e.g. the advent of Police and Crime Commissioners, the restructuring of NPIA and ACPO and the development of a College of Policing), the provision of international policing assistance by serving UK police officers faces an uncertain future. It is, however, highly likely that the project team will continue to work in an advisory capacity with members of ACPO International Affairs through the transition period and beyond.

An unexpected impact has been the extent to which the project team have been involved in international policing assistance policy development and strategy during the course of the project which has continued to the present time. This is linked to the rapid increase in international policing missions since the mid 1990s, which has generated growing interest amongst practitioners across UK police. In particular this interest has related to post-conflict and hostile environment policing - as demonstrated recently in Iraq and Afghanistan - and the demand for UK police within (e.g.) UN and EU-led missions. By extension this has promoted the need for 'best practice' in terms of the delivery processes of UK policing overseas; pre-deployment training and the use of 'lessons learnt' to inform future missions. In addition, the project has helped to develop collaborative projects (in relation to international policing) with international partners and to seek out future funding opportunities.

Not applicable.

Cite this outcome

Harvard

Emsley, Clive and Sinclair, Georgina. Exploring UK policing practices as a blueprint for democratic police reform: the overseas deployment of UK Police Officers, 1989 -2009: ESRC Impact Report, RES-000-22-3922. Swindon: ESRC

Vancouver

Emsley Clive and Sinclair Georgina. Exploring UK policing practices as a blueprint for democratic police reform: the overseas deployment of UK Police Officers, 1989 -2009: ESRC Impact Report, RES-000-22-3922. Swindon: ESRC.