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Our Research Catalogue contains grants and outputs data up until April/May 2014.

Who emits most? An analysis of UK households' CO2 emissions and their association with socio-economic factors

Grant reference: RES-000-22-4083

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Journal article details

Who bears the brunt? : distributional effects of climate change mitigation policies
Climate change scholars generally urge that CO2 emissions need to be cut rapidly if we are to avoid dangerous risks of climate change. However, climate change mitigation policies are widely perceived to have regressive effects — that is, putting a higher financial burden as a proportion of household income on poor than on rich households. This is one of several major barriers to the adoption of effective mitigation policies. They would also have considerable social justice implications requiring significant welfare state responses. We assess the claim that climate change policies have regressive effects by comparing different types of mitigation policies. We will argue that many of these are indeed likely to have regressive distributional implications but that there are several policy options to counteract regressive effects.
10.1177/0261018310396036
English

Primary contributor

Author Milena Buechs

Additional contributors

Co-author Nicholas Bardsley
Co-author Sebastian Duwe

Additional details

31
2
Yes
0261-0183
SAGE Publications
01 May 2011
285-307
London
Post-print
Critical social policy

Cite this outcome

Harvard

Buechs, Milena et al (2011) Who bears the brunt? : distributional effects of climate change mitigation policies. Critical social policy. 31 (2), pp. 285-307 London: SAGE Publications.

Vancouver

Buechs Milena et al. Who bears the brunt? : distributional effects of climate change mitigation policies. Critical social policy 2011; 31 (2): 285-307.