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Our Research Catalogue contains grants and outputs data up to the end of April 2014. Records will no longer be updated after this date.

Emotion Regulation of Others and Self (EROS): A Collaborative Research Network

Grant reference: RES-060-25-0044

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Conference paper/presentation details

The neural basis of using implementation intentions for emotion regulation
This study aimed to investigate the neural basis of a particular form of automatic ER; one that is supported by ‘implementation intentions’. Implementation intentions are ‘if-then’ plans that link a situational cue (e.g., “If I see something disgusting”) with a suitable goal directed response (e.g., “then I will think these are just pixels on the screen!”). The automaticity of implementation effects is thought to be driven by the strong associations between the cue for action and the subsequent goal-directed behavior that obviates the need for conscious deliberation. 40 healthy participants (20 female) underwent 3.0T fMRI while viewing a series of emotion-eliciting images. A between-subject design was used whereby participants used either a goal intention or implementation intention strategy on certain trials and on other trials viewed images under the instruction to ‘attend’. Each participant underwent two counterbalanced runs in which they used either implementation intentions or goal intentions to ‘reappraise’ or ‘suppress’ their emotional responses. Both implementation intention and goal intention strategies recruit brain areas previously shown to be involved in effortful ER (e.g. pre-SMA). However, preliminary direct comparisons between strategies show the effects of implementation intentions may be additionally supported by brain areas (i.e. right inferior parietal lobule) involved in the ‘social brain’, which may relate to alterations in the sense of ‘agency’ experienced in the implementation intention instruction. This study is the first to use fMRI to investigate the neural basis of ER by implementation intentions and promises to advance understanding of the differing neural mechanisms underpinning effortful and automatic ER. The findings will likely have translational clinical value given the high prevalence of emotion regulation deficits in psychiatric illness.
English

Primary contributor

Author Glyn Hallam

Additional contributors

Co-author Thomas Webb
Co-author Pachal Sheeran
Co-author Eleanor Miles
Co-author Iain Wilkinson
Co-author Peter Totterdell
Co-author Peter Woodruff
Co-author Michael Hunter
Co-author Tom Farrow

Additional details

Yes
10 June 2012
Annual meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM 2012)
Beijing
18th
10 June 2012

Cite this outcome

Harvard

Hallam, Glyn et al The neural basis of using implementation intentions for emotion regulation. Annual meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM 2012), 18th, Beijing, 2012.

Vancouver

Hallam Glyn et al. The neural basis of using implementation intentions for emotion regulation. Annual meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM 2012), 18th, Beijing, 2012.