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Family and business in north-west England, 1760-1820

Grant reference: RES-062-23-0593

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Journal article details

Inheritance and continuity in small family businesses during the early industrial revolution
Explanations for the rapid turnover rates of small businesses during the early years of British industrialisation are usually framed in terms of mismanagement or misfortune. More recently, the short lifespans of family businesses have been presented in the context of family ambitions and priorities. Whilst these explanations are persuasive, such studies tend to describe a reluctance to continue the family firm after the death of the head of household. By utilising evidence of both formal and informal methods of post-mortem estate disposal in Liverpool and Manchester we argue that the petite bourgeoisie of the early Industrial Revolution were more likely than has been thought to continue family businesses and to treat them as valuable going concerns. Moreover, we identify a degree of freedom on the part of those who inherited that allowed them to use their own judgements about the best interests of surviving family members.
10.1080/00076791.2011.631117
English

Primary contributor

Author Hannah Barker

Additional contributors

Co-author Mina Ishizu

Additional details

54
2
Yes
0007-6791
Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
01 January 2012
227-244
Abingdon
Post-print
Business history

Cite this outcome

Harvard

Barker, Hannah and Ishizu, Mina (2012) Inheritance and continuity in small family businesses during the early industrial revolution. Business history. 54 (2), pp. 227-244 Abingdon: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.

Vancouver

Barker Hannah and Ishizu Mina. Inheritance and continuity in small family businesses during the early industrial revolution. Business history 2012; 54 (2): 227-244.