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Our Research Catalogue contains grants and outputs data up to the end of April 2014. Records will no longer be updated after this date.

Organisations, Innovation and Security in the Twenty-First Century.

Grant reference: RES-071-27-0069

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Journal article details

COIN machine : the British military in Afghanistan
This article assesses the British military effort in Afghanistan looking at three key elements in the campaign: strategy, military operations, and the inter-agency “Comprehensive Approach.” We start by recognising the scale of the challenge that has faced the British: of all the provinces in Afghanistan, Helmand is the toughest to stabilize and secure. We then examine the evolution of all three elements above and find significant improvements in each: a flawed strategy has been corrected; the military have received more resources and become significantly better at COIN; and there is significant progress in the development of the inter-agency approach. In short, what the Americans will find in Helmand is a British COIN machine; a little creaky perhaps, but one that is fit for purpose and getting the job done. We briefly conclude on the prospects and the key to success: namely the development of a more coherent international strategy that accommodates the challenges posed by both Afghanistan and Pakistan.
10.1016/j.orbis.2009.07.002
English

Primary contributor

Author Theo Farrell

Additional contributors

Co-author Stuart Gordon

Additional details

53
4
Yes
0030-4387
Elsevier
01 September 2009
Paperback
665-683
Amsterdam
Post-print
Orbis

Files

Cite this outcome

Harvard

Farrell, Theo and Gordon, Stuart (2009) COIN machine : the British military in Afghanistan. Orbis. 53 (4), pp. 665-683 Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Vancouver

Farrell Theo and Gordon Stuart. COIN machine : the British military in Afghanistan. Orbis 2009; 53 (4): 665-683.