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Promotion of quality of life in older age and active ageing: follow-on funding

Grant reference: RES-189-25-0108

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Impact Report details

RES 189 25 0108Promotion of quality of life in older age and active ageing: follow-on funding
The aims of the ESRC follow-on funding were: 1) Wider dissemination of the tested Older People’s Quality of Life questionnaire (OPQOL) to policy and practice audiences for their use in the assessment of public policy (e.g. health and social care; public health local authority and neighbourhood planning); 2) Wider dissemination of the findings on how QoL in older age can be promoted, and active ageing enhanced to i) a policy and practice audience and ii) lay audiences. As planned in the proposal, and stated in the 2011 final report, the ESRC follow-on funding enabled AB to collaborate, for the dissemination, with the International Longevity Centre UK (ILC UK) - a think-tank impacting policy on longevity, ageing and population change (and who planned national and regional presentations/dissemination events for older people, policy makers and practitioners); AgeUK (who disseminated research summaries to their lay and policy members and is working actively with AB to develop further research); and Pamela Merritt (P. Readhead - ESRC freelance journalist, who produced and disseminated press releases, in collaboration with ESRC and AB’s institutional press office). In addition to these fruitful collaborations, the research was presented at additional lay, policy and practice meetings and academic conferences, and papers published.
English

Primary contributor

Author Ann Bowling

Impacts

Our research on quality of life and older age since 1999, was funded initially by ESRC (Growing Older programme) & Cross-Research Council funding (New Dynamics of Ageing programme), and disseminated by the ESRC Follow-on Funding award. The latter disseminated the findings and measures of quality of life resulting from it. We developed and tested long and brief versions, of bottom-up, lay-based measures of quality of life in older age, cross- validated by theory. These were shown to have more social relevance, and higher levels of reliability and validity than existing measures. The resulting measures are used internationally, and, as well as publications in international journals, have led to stakeholder, voluntary body and academic conference invitations to present it. It has also led to an invitation (Sept. 2012) from WHO in Geneva to contribute a chapter on quality of life in a policy volume they are producing with AgeUK. AB’s current awards build on this work (the measure is used as an outcome measure in an exercise RCT with older people (AB co-applicant: PI S Iliffe, UCL: NIHR, HTA : http://www. protocol of the ProAct 65+ trial - UK PubMed Central (UKPMC). It has led to a current award on quality of life and dementia in homeless people in which AB is currently doing the systematic review (AB coapplicant, PI: J Manthorpe, Kings: NIHR, SDO), and her expertise in quality of life outcomes informs her other awards (e.g. social well-being outcomes in an RCT of telephone support (AB co-applicant, PI: G Mountain, Sheffield, NIHR, PHRb), (satisfaction with care (AB co-applicant, PI N Greenwood, SGUL), disability and QoL trajectories in Women’s Regional Heart Study (AB co-applicant, PI S Ebrahim, LSHTM, DH), and AB’s ESRC award on loneliness in later life (AB co-applicant, PI C Victor, Brunel) has developed from the research on quality of life and our earlier collaborations on quality of life and loneliness (ESRC award PI C. Victor).

The follow-on funding was a dissemination award. The International Longevity Centre organised dissemination activities at several Older People's Forums (see last report for full details) and the older people attending prioritised items from our measure of quality of life in older age (OPQOL) in workshops. This led to the development and testing of the OPQOL-brief. This was recently published online:• • Bowling A, Hankins M, Windle G, Bilotta C, Grant R. (2012). A short measure of quality of life in older age: The performance of the brief Older People's Quality of Life questionnaire (OPQOL-brief). 20 September 2012 online. www. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Sep 18. pii: S0167-4943(12)00183-5. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2012.08.012. Epub ahead of print This work has also led to a recent invitation from WHO & AgeUK to contribute a chapter in their forthcoming volume on ageing aimed at policy makers: Submitted Sept. 2012 but not yet published (so not edited/uploaded yet in my outputs): Bowling A. Quality of life. (2013). Chapter in WHO-AgeUK policy volume: Improving later life 2. Ed John Beard, Director Dept Ageing and Life Course, WHO Geneva. AgeUK England.

Active dissemination (see last report), ongoing analyses of older people's views expressed at Older People's Forums and development and testing (and publication) of the short measure of quality of life in older age (OPQOL-Brief) for use in policy evaluation and descriptive research. Collaborations continuing with the Italian version of the OPQOL, where it is used in comprehensive geriatric assessments in out-patients in Milan. In addition, further analyses of variations in priorities for quality of life among people in ethnic groups was conducted and given to ONS in feedback of their 4 new well-being indicators which were being tested nationally:- Grant, R. and Bowling, A. (2011) Challenges in comparing the quality of life of older people between ethnic groups, and the implications for national well-being indicators: a secondary analysis of two cross-sectional surveys. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 9, 109. As a result of this body of work, I was invited to give a plenary presentation on it to policy makers, in 2012: AgeUK & Campaign to End Loneliness. International conference (Gulbenkian Foundation) on Loneliness and well-being. Invited plenary presentation: ‘What do we know about well-being, how to measure it, and what influences it.’ Mansfield College, Oxford, July 9-10, 2012.

The underpinning research has always been widely cited by DH and other policy reports aiming to promote well-being, as politicians and policy makers across sectors are now focusing their energies on ways of improving population well-being, and ultimately, QoL, including the UK government. AB has long been invited to present to government representatives. The baseline research was referenced in government documents on well-being in Scotland and England & Wales (now archived). History: It was also referenced in the DWP (2006) government report, Opportunity Age (see para 1.45, p 37/131 and ref. 18) for reproduction of our drivers of QoL, citations and reference to us on the policy aim of promoting active ageing, social participation, including in the workforce, and thereby QoL, in older age www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/opportunity-age-volume1.pdf. The DWP subsequent (now archived) report on implementation shows the influence of this, and other’s, work: free access to activities (swimming), and promotion of volunteering among older people. In 2010 ONS was funded by the government to examine measures of well-being; we have fed directly into discussions and decisions on the final questions. AB has been involved in lay and policy engagement as a member of the cross UK research councils New Dynamics of Ageing dissemination activities (2000-2011): www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk. AB’s research on QoL was also used to inform the Scottish Executive’s policy document on well-being, which stated (p55) ‘By demonstrating how multi-faceted the concept of QoL is, this research gives us valuable insight...These findings also demonstrate how the importance placed on different dimensions of QoL varies according to population demographics and....may therefore shift over time...’ (p55) (www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2006/01/13110743/22 - research described and commented on as ‘... of particular significance’ (p57) on - pages 54-57.

This work has also led to a recent invitation from WHO & AgeUK to contribute a chapter in their forthcoming volume on ageing aimed at policy makers: Submitted Sept. 2012 but not yet published (so not edited/uploaded yet in my outputs): Bowling A. Quality of life. (2013). Chapter in WHO-AgeUK policy volume: Improving later life 2. Ed John Beard, Director Dept Ageing and Life Course, WHO Geneva. AgeUK England. Contibution to awareness of issues surrounding improving quality of life and well-being in older age. The underpinning research has always been widely cited by DH and other policy reports aiming to promote well-being.

The research highlighted drivers of quality of life in older age.We found that the most important influences on whether we experience a good, rather than bad, quality of life in older age are one’s social relationships, and having social roles and activities. The research resulted in the provision of a long and short quality of life questionnaire in older age for policy evaluation and descriptive research. The questionnaire and policy reports are freely available from the International Longevity Centre (ILC) website - www.ilcuk.org.uk - see next.

Publications, presentations and especially now. Web link to the ILC page - with links to all the linked publications (the questionnaire, scoring and norms, etc) http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/index.php/publications/publication_details/good_neighbours_measuring_quality_of_life_in_old_age This is the ILC direct link to the main report pdf www.ilcuk.org.uk/images/uploads/publication-pdfs/pdf_pdf_159.pdf Impact also achieved in 2012 by plenary presentation of the work at the Campaign to Prevent Loneliness 2012 conference in Oxford. http://www.campaigntoendloneliness.org.uk/loneliness-conference/ I have had many contacts as a result, including voluntary sector, e.g (with permission). ---- Original Message ----- From: Keith Arscott To: a.bowling@btinternet.com Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2012 1:38 PM Subject: Loneliness Conference Dear Professor Bowling, I enjoyed your presentation at the conference this week. And some of your stats were of real interest – such as (I think) “81% said social relationships gave quality to life”. We know that is so true because of what we do a s a charity and the difference it makes to peoples’ lives. I know that there will be slides available but I wondered if there was more information about Southampton’s research into this topic that is easily accessible to the public. I hope that you don’t mind me getting in direct contact – but any advices/further insights appreciated. Kind regards, Keith Keith Arscott Director Telephone 020 7420 5813 keith.arscott@contact-the-elderly.org.uk www.contact-the-elderly.org.uk Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook Contact the Elderly 15 Henrietta Street London WC2E 8QG A Lifeline of Friendship Contact the Elderly is a registered charity in England and Wales (1146149) and in Scotland (SC039377). Company Number (07869142) Registered office: 15 Henrietta Street, London WC2E 8QG.

Government thinking on policy for promoting well-being in older age (facilitated by Campaign to Prevent Loneliness 2012 conference in Oxford. http://www.campaigntoendloneliness.org.uk/loneliness-conference/ , and by International Longevity Centre website access to my work www.ilcuk.org.uk/images/uploads/publication-pdfs/pdf_pdf_159.pdf . Users of the OPQOL (see last report) and geriatric out-patients in Milan where OPQOL is used in assessment ofntheir needs and outcomes. Additional user of OPQOL 2012 Jo Ann Kukulus Notre dame de Namur University, Belmont, California USA in study of social activity in older age (JoAnn Kukulus@sbcglobal.net).

Aim to improve quality of life and well-being in older age. Please note: this is an ongoing, cumulative process and it is building on the history of my two ESRC awards on quality of life, and the follow-on funding awards - e.g. History: The baseline research was referenced in government documents on well-being in Scotland and England & Wales (now archived). History: It was also referenced in the DWP (2006) government report, Opportunity Age (see para 1.45, p 37/131 and ref. 18) for reproduction of our drivers of QoL, citations and reference to us on the policy aim of promoting active ageing, social participation, including in the workforce, and thereby QoL, in older age www.dwp.gov.uk/docs/opportunity-age-volume1.pdf. The DWP subsequent (now archived) report on implementation shows the influence of this, and other’s, work: free access to activities (swimming), and promotion of volunteering among older people. In 2010 ONS was funded by the government to examine measures of well-being; we have fed directly into discussions and decisions on the final questions. AB has been involved in lay and policy engagement as a member of the cross UK research councils New Dynamics of Ageing dissemination activities (2000-2011): www.newdynamics.group.shef.ac.uk. AB’s research on QoL was also used to inform the Scottish Executive’s policy document on well-being, which stated (p55) ‘By demonstrating how multi-faceted the concept of QoL is, this research gives us valuable insight...These findings also demonstrate how the importance placed on different dimensions of QoL varies according to population demographics and....may therefore shift over time...’ (p55) (www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2006/01/13110743/22 - research described and commented on as ‘... of particular significance’ (p57) on - pages 54-57.

Paul Cann AgeUK Oxford and Campaign to end loneliness facilitated my contact with Paul Brstow, MP, who is looking for a user-relevant measure of well-being in older age, for use in policy evaluation: Dear Ann Thanks very much for getting in touch and I'm glad you enjoyed the Minister's speech. We are interested to read about the QoL questionnaire and I have forwarded the details to colleagues working on development of the adult Social Care Outcomes Framework. They will be in touch should the need to explore further with you. Thanks again, this is very helpful. Lorraine Jackson Senior Policy Manager Older People & Dementia Branch Department of Health Message sent from a Blackberry handheld device. ________________________________________ From: "Ann Bowling" [a.bowling@btinternet.com] Sent: 14/07/2012 11:45 CET To: Lorraine Jackson Cc: ;

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Cite this outcome

Harvard

Bowling, Ann. Promotion of quality of life in older age and active ageing: follow-on funding: ESRC Impact Report, RES-189-25-0108. Swindon: ESRC

Vancouver

Bowling Ann. Promotion of quality of life in older age and active ageing: follow-on funding: ESRC Impact Report, RES-189-25-0108. Swindon: ESRC.