Press releases

Read the latest press releases from ESRC and our major investments. You can access press releases that we have published since 2009.

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Printing the future: 3D printing and intellectual property

As part of the ESRC Festival of Social Science, Dr Dinusha Mendis is hosting an event which will bring together industry experts, social scientists, policymakers, lawyers, economists and manufacturers of 3D printing to discuss the latest developments and understand the implications for users and consumers.

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Battle metaphors for cancer can be harmful

Media portrayals of cancer as a battle to be fought, and its focus on 'brave fighters' beating the odds, can lead to feelings of guilt and failure in people with a terminal diagnosis, according to research.

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Our different concerns are revealed: confidentiality is key to big data

A new network of data research centres is enabling academics to access ever more useful data sets for the research. While safeguarding the identities of individuals, the network has opened up some of the 'big data' routinely collected by business and local government organisations.

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Crime falling? Yes, but it's also evolving

We are always being told that crime levels are falling, but is that true for all types of crime? New research looking at the changing trends of crime in Scotland shows that the majority are less likely than ever to become a victim of crime. However, this picture hides the fact that many people living in high crime areas will continue to be victimised.

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Ageing exhibition kicks off 2014 Festival

ESRC is launching its biggest ever Festival of Social Science with an exhibition highlighting the opportunities and challenges posed by an ageing population.

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Charities need to trust volunteers' expertise

Charities struggling to raise money for their cause should be making better use of their army of volunteers, according to research presented at the 2014 ESRC Festival of Social Science.

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Berlin Wall marked a difference in parenting

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, the birth rate in East Germany effectively halved. The change from communism to capitalism signified a period of intense economic uncertainty, putting many people off having children. Those who were born at this time grew up markedly different from other generations, being more likely to commit crimes as adults.

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Genes play a key part in the recipe for a happy country

Why are the Danes naturally more cheerful than the Brits, and why are we in turn more upbeat than the French? Research presented as part of this year's ESRC Festival of Social Sciences shows us that the recipe behind a happy nation includes a list of ingredients – but specific genetic factors can have a significant effect.

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Rise in betting shops fuels crime fears

Growing numbers of betting shops in UK towns are fuelling residents' fears of a rise in anti-social behaviour and crime, particularly violence and burglary.

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Mass observation reveals minutiae of daily life

What did a 1930s housewife have in her larder? How did a 1940s office worker spend their lunch hour? What clothes were hanging in a 1950s teenagers' wardrobe? Extraordinarily detailed answers to these questions can be found among a unique collection of material on everyday life housed in the Mass Observation Archive.

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