Press releases

Read the latest press releases from ESRC and our major investments. You can access press releases that we have published since 2009.

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Sad refugee

Ending refugees’ exile

Often refugees cannot just return to their home country when conflict ends. Research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) shows that for many refugees a quick return isn't the right answer.

Eye in face

More to facial perception than meets the eye

People make complex judgements about a person from looking at their face that are based on a range of factors beyond simply their race and gender, according to findings of new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

Student with laptop

Digital revolution bypassing UK education

Teaching and learning in the 21st century needs to be 'turbo-charged' by educational technology rather than using technologies designed for other purposes, according to a new TEL report.

Mentor

UK children need more volunteer male befrienders

Many boys say they would prefer a male befriender according to early findings, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). Yet, less than a quarter of UK volunteer child befrienders are men.

head in a bag

Soldiers who desecrate the dead see themselves as hunters

Modern day soldiers who mutilate enemy corpses or take body-parts as trophies are usually thought to be suffering from the extreme stresses of battle according to research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

Gravestones

Humanist funerals

Funeral directors need to be aware of the needs of non-religious people. A unique investigation into the subject funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) provides a snapshot of a defining aspect of life - or indeed death.

Berlin street

Urban landscape's power to hurt or heal

Research shows that street furniture, barriers, parks, public spaces and neighbourhood architecture can stir up powerful emotions in local residents. This should be taken into account in programmes designed to reduce tensions and foster community cohesion.

Euroface

Experiences of migrant children: at home abroad

Schools, local councils and professionals need better guidance and training to work with migrant families from Eastern Europe and their children, according to new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

Ancient barmaid

Key lessons from history on alcohol taxes

Steep rises in taxes on alcohol do not necessarily reduce consumption, according to research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) into the history of intoxicants in 16th and 17th England.

Boy on Computer

Not all today’s students are 'tech-savvy'

A small minority of today's university students don't use email and others are confused by the array of technologies available at universities. Yet many students couldn’t bear to be without their mobile phones and find themselves distracted by social networking sites during study.

School girls

Raising the school leaving – while learning from another age

In April 1947 the Labour Government raised the school leaving age from 14 to 15. It was raised to 16 in 1972. As the UK prepares to raise the 'education participation age' to 17 in 2013 and to 18 in 2015, new research reveals that the 1947 and 1972 transitions met with more controversy and difficulty than previously thought.

Planning

Empowered citizens or hopeful bystanders?

The new political appetite for 'localism' in town planning has triggered anxiety within local communities and amongst those charged with making it work, according to new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

Coalmine

UN emission market needs urgent reform

The United Nations (UN) global carbon market requires substantial reform because it too often fails to support the projects and people it is meant to help, according to new research from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

UK Large Map

Survey paints a portrait of the UK

A complex and fascinating portrait of a society suffering the effects of the deepest recession since the early 1990s and in which young people appear to have been hardest hit is revealed by new findings from the UK’s largest longitudinal household survey Understanding Society.

House move

A nation of frustrated home-movers

The downturn in the housing market in the last three years has left the UK a nation of frustrated, unfulfilled house-movers, according to the latest data from Understanding Society, a study of 40,000 UK households funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Boys passing cigarettes

Does your mother know?

Do your parents know where you are at night? According to 36 per cent of 15 year old boys and nearly a quarter of 15 year old girls the answer to that question, at least once a month, is no

Teenager

A healthy teenager is a happy teenager

Teenagers who turn their backs on a healthy lifestyle and turn to drink, cigarettes and junk food are significantly unhappier than their healthier peers.

Job Applicant

Young people face double penalty in a slow job market

New research from Understanding Society, a study of more than 40,000 UK households, has examined what is driving this uneven employment pattern and finds that young people suffer from a ‘double-penalty’ in their attempts to find and keep a job.

Kissing Couple

UK is a nation of supportive partners

Partners provide a vital source of positive emotional support for the vast majority of people in the UK. Nine out of ten people who were married or cohabiting talk to their partner about their worries, according to data from Understanding Society, the world’s largest longitudinal household study of 40,000 UK households.

Milk Jug

What we mean when we ask for the milk

New research into the different ways that English and Polish people use language in everyday family situations can help members of each community to understand each other better and avoid cultural misunderstandings.

Pocket the money

Tackling financial exploitation of elderly people

Professionals who are in close contact with elderly people could soon be in a better position to spot if they are being financially exploited thanks to a pioneering new study funded by the UK Research Councils’ New Dynamics of Ageing programme (NDA)

Chinaman

East views the world differently to West

Cultural differences between the West and East are well documented, but a study shows that concrete differences also exist in how British and Chinese people recognise people and the world around them according to new research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

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